Notice & Note: Student Bookmarks

Hello my dear friends! I'm stopping by to share a little something I've made for my students...


And I hope it's something your students can use as well!

This past summer I read Notice and Note: Strategies for Close Reading. Have you ever read a book where you find yourself constantly nodding your head and agreeing? Or saying "oh my gosh!! I needed this LAST year!". 

This is one of those books.

The authors, Kylene Beers and Robert E. Probst have identified six major "signposts" we see so often in children's/young adult literature. From "Words of the Wiser" (where an older character offers advice to the main character) to "Aha Moments" (where the main character suddenly realizes something important)--all of those key moments in a text that our students tend to breeze right past while reading.

At each signpost, students learn to stop and ask themselves a key question. These questions are designed to help students make inferences, determine theme, discover the conflict, and so much more.

The best part?

It is SO simple. Six signposts. Six questions. Yet applicable to all student texts.

The students catch on very quickly and begin to make signpost observations and ask these questions right away, thanks to this simplicity. And it makes it so easy to start "creating a habit of mind" as the authors say, to help students notice and read closely in all texts they encounter.

My 5th graders and I have been going through the introductory lessons so far and I'm looking forward to sharing much more as we learn to read closely together.

Today, I wanted to share the bookmarks I'll be giving my students this week...please click on the image below to download them:
http://bit.ly/signpostbookmark
(there are two versions...I'm using just "Contradictions" in my class, but I included the "Contrasts and Contradictions" bookmark as well)

I also have matching anchor chart printables to share, if you are interested in those...just let me know and I will share them here in the next blog post.

Have you read Notice and Note yet? Have you used these strategies in your class? We would love to hear what you have learned!
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